Un blog de mitos, leyendas, costumbres y tradiciones de México

Entradas etiquetadas como ‘Leyendas potosinas en inglés’

Myths and legends from San Luis Potosi: The ahuichote

THE AHUICHOTE

Folk story heard in Las Carboneras, Matehuala, San Luis Potosi

A long time ago, I was doing some work in the highlands, in the Altiplano Potosino, and of course I took great interest in the local myths and legends. Every evening I spent time talking to the local people and hearing their stories. It was very surprising to learn about an ahuichote ― a sort of animal spirit that announces death. In the Aztec folklore there’s a mythological animal called “ahuizotl”, but its description and its purpose has nothing to do with the ahuichote (also referred as “ahuizote”, “agüichote “or “güichote”) I found in the Altiplano. In the end I concluded that this spirit was “new” to universal mythology, and should be included.

Anyway, I heard different stories of this ahuichote, and all of them spoke of how such spirit was the messenger of Death. One night, while drinking hot chocolate by the fire place, and old lady told me: “Years ago, for several days we heard a strange howl and we knew something bad was going to happen. A couple of days later we learned that Chencho died in Monterrey. His corpse arrived at midnight and we all went to his poor house to veil him. All the time we were veiling Chencho, we kept hearing a strange noise. It was like a cry of a coyote, but not quite the same. It was an inhuman howl; not from this world. We could hear it, and we all knew what it was. Yes, it was the howl of the ahuichote itself, because he was saying that there was a dead person in the village. And that dead person was Chencho, who was from this village but living in Monterrey. The ahuichote cried all night. Legend written by Homero Adame.

“Next morning, after the service offered by a priest from Matehuala, we all went to the cemetery for Chencho’s funeral. And the frightening howl of the ahuichote was harder and sadder than ever. When the grave was covered with soil, the howling stopped. We didn’t hear the ahuichote again that day, and not for many days.

Here we all know that when the ahuichote howls, somebody is going to die”. Homero Adame’s folk story found at: https://adameleyendas.wordpress.com/2010/10/22/myths-and-legends-from-san-luis-potosi-el-ahuichote/

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You can find more Mexican myths and legends on this link: Mexican folk stories.

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Myths and legends from San Luis Potosi: The Ghost Wagon

THE GHOST WAGON

(Folk story from Vanegas, SLP)

The story I’m about to tell you is true; it often happens here, in Vanegas. And I have seen it myself!

On that side of the road ― “The Barrio”, as we call it ― a lot of people say that they often see an old wagon pass at midnight. Nothing else, just the mysterious shape of an old wagon, bumping slowly along the road, with a silent driver in a big, black cloak… Ghost Wagon - picture taken by Homero AdameWhat’s more, you can also hear the wagon, clattering and creaking, as it makes its way along the dusty, old, unpaved road. Homero Adame’s folk stories.

The strange thing is that whenever anybody sees or hears the old wagon go by, everyone knows that something awful is going to happen. As you very well know, people don’t generally drive these old wagons anymore; they’re almost obsolete. Only a few small farmers still use them now and again, to carry their alfalfa or other crops at harvest time. So, it’s rather unusual to see such an old wagon these days.

Now this is the good part of the story ― or maybe it’s the bad part, really! From time to time, feeling very brave as young people often do, some youth or other will start to follow the wagon. But guess what? When they see that the wagon drives straight to the cemetery, they all run away as fast as their legs can carry them. Then, the wagon drives straight through the locked gates and… disappears! Folk story taken from Homero Adame’s blog at: https://adameleyendas.wordpress.com/2010/10/20/myths-and-legends-from-san-luis-potosi-the-ghost-wagon/

  • If you’d like to read more Mexican Folktales, just follow this link, surf and enjoy!

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